Emily’s Eight by// Emily Owens

Eight Slang Words Your Grandma Uses

We all know that if your parents and or grandparents are using the slang words you’re using then it’s time to move on and find other terms to use. Last summer I was with my grandparents in Charleston, South Carolina, and they said the word “lightweight” to explain how sunburnt I was. After they said that, I think I was permanently scarred. To make things worse they started to say “heavyweight” as if that was a thing. It took me awhile to get over the fact that my grandparents were trying to use slang, but then I realized that with everyone getting on the internet that my grandparents using slang is inevitable. You know what they say, we are an evolving species.

Here the top eight slang words I’ve heard my grandma say:

  1. “Lit”

Lit was actually a slang term first used in the 1970s that meant almost exactly what it means today, to be “stoned, drunk, or having fun at a party” today the term can be used to describe all of those instances. However it evolved to be mainly used to described as something exciting and really fun.

Emily’s Grandma: “Aren’t these homemade tortillas lit?”

    

  1. “Finesse”
    Finesse appeared in the 80’s cult movement, and recurred recently through the fashion and music outlets. In the 80’s “finesse” meant something rather fancy and expensive. Today it means a number of things: “gotcha ya”, “took it from you”, “tricked you”, “played it”.

Emily’s Grandma: “Wow, I just finessed making this bed.”

  1.     “Got em”

When I heard my grandma say this word I immediately regretted ever saying it. “Got em”, derived from a viral video of a funny looking man pranking his dad about what he got in the mail. The punch line, while is rather inappropriate, had the limelight for awhile. However what he said after the punch line is what stuck. “HA GOTEMMM”. So the youth of America continued to use the term when a prank goes over well. Of course I stopped using the term.

Emily’s Grandma: “Hey Emily there’s a bug on your shoulder…”

Emily: “ *screams* Where Grandma?!”

Emily’s Grandma: “NOWHERE GOT EM!”

  1. “LOL”

I am pretty sure everyone on planet earth has used the term LOL. The term has evolved into many different meanings. Most people, though now, use it to express that they found something funny or amusing. However, with my grandpa it meant totally something different.

Emily’s little sister: “LOL grandpa, you have to turn it on first…”

Emily’s Grandpa: “Why did you just say: “Lots of Love?”

Emily’s little sister and Emily: “…Uh what?”

Emily’s Grandpa: “LOL means ‘Lots of Love’”.

Emily: “No Grandpa, it doesn’t anymore. It means “Laugh out loud”.

Emily’s Grandpa: “Seriously?!”

  1. “Nah”

“Nah” is variant spelling of “no” used to answer a question. When my grandma said it though it sounded foreign and wrong – I’ll never forget it.

Emily: “Hey Grandma do you need any help?”

Emily’s Grandma: “NAH GIRLFRIEND.”

Emily: “Please don’t.”

  1. “Bruh”

“Bruh” is another way to say “bro”. It was popularly used to express disappointment or frustration. Also, in recent years “bruh” is used when you see something funny happen to someone else.

Emily: “Um Grandma, I accidentally messed up these churros.”

Emily’s Grandma: “BRUH.”

Emily: “What did you just say?????”

  1. “OMG”

“OMG” means, “Oh my god”. This abbreviation is one the most popular used abbreviation ever. It is commonly used to express surprise or disgust.

Emily’s Grandma: “OMG there’s too much salt in this soup. Emily fix it.”

Emily: “Only if you promise never to say OMG again”

Emily’s Grandma: “Deal.”

  1. “Saucin”

“Saucin” is relatively a new term. It means two different things: If it’s in the context of how you look, it can mean you look good. Another way to use it is when someone is making fun of you.

Emily: “Teghan got sauced up today by Sophie. It was hilarious.”

Emily’s Grandma: “Really what sauce was Sophie making? Tomato?”

 

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